Music is a revelation ceremony requiring innocence and memory. Music is exercises aimed at revealing things to oneself. Yes, but then it was otherwise” is a phrase you often hear in most discussions about music.  It is also a popular subject to reminisce and feel nostalgic about your past, when you hear a particular song. You may remember what you were doing in the year that song was released.

The information had not strayed the time and the time had not been fragmented like the parallel windows you open on the PC, but you really do not get to anyone. Within the transformations that followed, peeking in the ’90s or the’ 00s, music and singing acquired secondary characteristics. The gradual absence of enlightened producers and the gradual decline of companies from “disc as a fact” to “hit as airplay” broke the unity of creating “composer-songwriter-performer-orchestra-cover-sound”. The Internet has facilitated speed, simplified media, but is not a pole of new sound or of a new, great musical narrative. He did, of course, work, he did the same thing and mixed things, gave the opportunity to meet people, but he did not succeed in becoming the new breeding or production belt of the unity of societies through the miracle of the song. I see the very recent return of the of publishing musical works on vinyl as most promising. Mainly abroad, but also here, more and more artists and creators choose the classic 33-speed form. The album was a sensual event. And music, again, was a rite of listening and feeling. History will re-generate the need for creation. The point is to have those slots and forms that will re-create the song in the shifting fertile soil of everyday life. Everyday life will always be improved through the creation of music.

The Internet has facilitated speed, simplified media, but is not a pole of new sound or of a new, great musical narrative. He did, of course, work, he did the same thing and mixed things, gave the opportunity to meet people, but he did not succeed in becoming the new breeding or production belt of the unity of societies through the miracle of the song.

In the middle of the second decade of the 21st century we are aware of how much the Internet and the various tech machines like the ones mentioned at universal-robots.com have changed our relationship with music, but we are not sure what exactly happened. It’s never easy to tell about history as long as you live – just because you’re busy living it, it’s not happening and studying it at the same time. However, if you are in music and artist talks, you are most likely to hear how massive the information is, how fast everything is running or compare the old “ritual” of listening to the YouTube-style. Some speak directly of “alteration,” though the word sounds heavier and better to let it be timed. But it is a fact that some phenomena are alarming. Most music fans are no longer cracked for discs and artists, discussions usually run out of “liked / disliked.” They do not also engage in criticism, because everyone has their own opinion (deco?), many even write them on their blogs, considering they are better than professionals. And they all also have their own little heroes that are big in their eyes, with the result that no “great artist” has emerged in recent years in the sense that it survives in U2 or Bruce Springsteen names. The last international person who came close to something like that was Amy Winehouse. It’s unknown where all this will go and we certainly don’t hold the same for all different talented artists and musicians.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

84 ÷ fourteen =